East german officer hat

Previously, Shawn created the Applied Research at Accuvant Labs, helped launch the Penetration Testing practice at FishNet Security, and has written on emerging threats and other topics for Information Security Magazine and ZDNet. Shawn's research has been featured in the Washington Post, BusinessWeek, NPR, and the New York Times, as well as countless other industry publications. Shawn has been a ten-time speaker at the BlackHat Briefings, and has been an invited speaker at other notable security conferences in the US, China, Canada, and Japan. Shawn has been a member of the BlackHat Briefings Review Board since 2008.

In 2010, the idea of trying to defeat Iraqi government forces militarily seemed futile. But a powerful underground organization took shape through acts of terror and protection rackets. When the uprising against the dictatorship of the Assad clan erupted in neighboring Syria, the organization's leaders sensed an opportunity. By late 2012, particularly in the north, the formerly omnipotent government forces had largely been defeated and expelled. Instead, there were now hundreds of local councils and rebel brigades, part of an anarchic mix that no one could keep track of. It was a state of vulnerability that the tightly organized group of ex-officers sought to exploit.

Another example of this type of sword has been brought to my attention by a novice collector in New Jersey, it was purchased years ago in Pennsylvania. It is made of bronze that had been scrubbed, so it may have originated from a collection in Germany. It is slightly larger at 22 1/8 inches in length. The statue/hilt is of a finer design and somewhat more angular, the primary figure may be of Hercules only, or of Commodus as Hercules. The sword appears to have been in a sheath perhaps on a statue of Commodus, some of the dings on the blade appear to have been made from impacting in antiquity, this suggests that it was used in a ritual. The sword's guard is made in the form of a gabled roof of a Roman temple, at least one of the two small intertwined figures inside this are as if taking (picking) one of the balls (this validates my speculation that three balls that are also on the front of my example are in fact the Golden Apples). The first 3 to 4 inches of the blade has a rib with defined edges, this entire area is raised and squared at the bottom as part of the design, the way it is made shows that the sword may have for some unknown reason at times may have been partially drawn. The tip is crudely worked, this also gives more credence to my speculation that it had usually been in a sheath on a statue. In my opinion the sword may or may not have been used in a gladiator Commodus/Hercules ritual, but I am fairly certain that it was used in a Commodus/Hercules cult ritual. After a careful review of this sword and the sword posted here I have no doubt that there is a connection to the symbolism with these swords and the famed marble statue of Commodus as Hercules at the Capitoline Museum, Rome. The collector in New Jersey is offering his sword. If this is of interest then contact me at: [email protected] As a courtesy I will reply with the gentleman's contact information - Dave Kenney.

British army officers wore blue peaked caps as early as the Crimean War to distinguish themselves from enlisted men who wore the pillbox hat . The peaked caps were widely worn on campaign during the First and Second World Wars, until the more practical beret was popularised by generals like Bernard Montgomery . After the war, officers continued to wear khaki caps as part of the Number 2 dress uniform , but by the 1990s these had been phased out in favour of the dark blue and red caps previously worn with the Number 1 dress uniform .

East german officer hat

east german officer hat

British army officers wore blue peaked caps as early as the Crimean War to distinguish themselves from enlisted men who wore the pillbox hat . The peaked caps were widely worn on campaign during the First and Second World Wars, until the more practical beret was popularised by generals like Bernard Montgomery . After the war, officers continued to wear khaki caps as part of the Number 2 dress uniform , but by the 1990s these had been phased out in favour of the dark blue and red caps previously worn with the Number 1 dress uniform .

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